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will look at other hot topics affirmative action, same sex marriage, and voting rights. then, a new law in virginia may force many of the state's abortion clinics to shut down. and we will look and have local residents and virginia are organizing against a push by the nuclear and -- industry to lift the state's 3-year-long ban on uranium mining. >> we have spent 30 years on the fantasy of containment. there is no way to contain toxic or nuclear waste. he can come back to your drawing boards and come up with recommendations. but guess what? the community here and all the people down there river, all the way to north carolina and virginia beach are going to stop this. >> all that and more coming up. this is democracy now!,, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we are on the road in the capital of virginia, richmond. the official u.s. military death toll in afghanistan has passed the 2000 mark. more than 11 years into the war. in the latest attack, the suicide bomber killed 14 people, including three soldiers in the all the people down thereeastern khost r today. on
is defiant as police investigate the weekend fire that targeted his law offices. joe vasquez with the mayor declaring he won't be intimidated. joe? >> reporter: you can see the damage on the law office behind me, and now we're learning of yet another arson fire reported today just a few blocks away. the new fire at a storage facility behind the village cocktail lounge was called in just after 6:00 this morning. investigators say it appears that the arsonist successfully torched the shed outback, destroying the contents, and see the torch marks on the windowsills? that appears to be another arson attempt at another store next door at a strip mall, but that attempt failed. the new fire is three blocks away from the fire that ripped through the law offices of vallejo mayor osby davis on saturday morning. police are not sure whether the two arsons are related. in the immediate aftermath of saturday's fire, mayor davis had tears streaming down his cheeks. >> whatever attempts are necessary to identify and arrest the persons responsible for this malicious, cowardly act, i'm sure they will do. >>
of the "national law journal" walks us through a term that will tackle affirmative action, and may decide disputes over same-sex marriage and civil rights law. >> woodruff: then we turn to the presidential campaign and the analysis of stuart rothenberg and susan page as the candidates fine tune their messages days before the first debate. >> brown: we zero in on one issue confronting the candidates. hari sreenivasan reports on the safety net program known as medicaid. >> anyone of us at an advanced age really is just one fall away from a broken hip that could end you up in a nursing home. >> woodruff: ray suarez talks with author hedrick smith. his new book explores the dismantling of the american dream for the middle class. >> brown: and we look at oppression and empowerment for women around the world, with journalists and filmmakers nicholas kristof and sheryl wudunn. >> once you give a woman education and a chance to work, she can astound you. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the
by the federal government, and they are challenging the law that allows this because they are concerned their communications will be picked up. up, and in the course of that surveillance, they have the right to challenge that in court. that is the standing issue. to get to the merits, fisa passed in 1978, and in the aftermath about abuses, it set up a system by which the executive branch would have to go to the court in d.c. and get permission when they wanted to do wiretapping for national security purposes. this is a way of making sure the court -- it had a check and a role in reviewing the efforts to do this wiretapping, which had designed in 1978 is congressthe problem is that in defining the parameters of what communications -- surveillance required court approval. the statute referred to the technology at the time, those communications that were wired, radioed, or satellite technology. since 1978 we have seen a dramatic change of the technology of communications, particularly fiber optic cable, which has changed the court they try to get this case in electronic surveillance. the r
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> ifill: a pennsylvania judge blocked a new law that would have required voters to show photo i.d. at the polls next month. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, ray suarez examines how the debate over voting rights and election year fraud is playing out around the country. >> ifill: then, we have two takes on the battle for north carolina. jeffrey brown reports on the tightening presidential contest. >> brown: barack obama won this state in 2008 by the slimmest of margins with help from a large african-american turnout. four years later in a down economy it looks like his challenge will be even greater. >> woodruff: and we talk with national public radio's greg allen. he focuses on the outreach to hispanics in the tar heel state. >> ifill: then margaret warner updates the investigation into the assault on the u.s. consulate in libya. >> woodruff: we look at new findings showing australia's great barrier reef has lost half its coral in the last 27 years. >> ifill: and we close wi
might have evidence that jesus christ had a wife. last week, a law professor who happens to be running for national office, was still defending her american indian ancestry. in fact, the liberal professor, elizabeth warren, has been talking about this since last spring, when the issue came up during her campaign to unseat senator scott brown, a republican. miss warren is a star in the democratic universe, a new and improved hillary clinton. perhaps even a presidential candidate, they say. she spent time as an adviser to president obam abut as the story goes, the republicans and even perhaps a few democrats ran her out of town. senator brown, if you haven't been paying attention, won his traditionally democratic seat in a special election after the death of senator ted kennedy, a tipoff to the white house that trouble lurk in the land of hope and change. so this is an extremely critical election for both parties as they fight to control the u.s. senate. it is a wonder that senator brown won an election in the people's republic of massachusetts t. might even take a miracle for him to hol
for the election. the law sparked a whole bunch of protests who say it alienates citizens. if they rule against the law it will be put on hold until after the election. >> check out the white house. this is what it looked like in honor of breast cancer awareness month. across the bond in london buckingham palace turning pink, too. those are your 5@5:00. >>> talking politics now president obama and mitt romney have the first debate tomorrow in november. >>> we have a new poll that is out but it hasn't done much for the politics the national average for the polls. it was up 3 and a half points. the national picture remains very, very close. one of the swing states is the scene of the debate. he got last minute campaigning he got a last minute endorsement from quarterback john elway. he is preparing for a much more critical stage on wednesday. >> these debates are an opportunity for each of us to describe the pathway forward for america that we would choose. american people are going to have to make their choice as to what kind of debate they want. it will be a conversation with the american peopl
law after law after law to limit your right to vote. voter i.d., voter registration, early voting. the republicans want less people voting in our democracy, not more. they're trying to roll back the clock on more than our century's worth of progress in civil rights. now the tide is turning. inch by inch, state by state, we've been reclaiming our rights and turning back the wave of voter suppression. we saw it when the justice department stepped in to block the laws in texas, south carolina and florida. we saw it when governors in six states all but one were democrats, vetoed voter i.d. laws. they were champions of democracy to do so. and we saw it when state and federal courts rejected laws in eight states, including today's major ruling in pennsylvania. this morning a judge blocked pennsylvania's controversial voter i.d. from going into effect before the november election. after it was revealed that hundreds of thousands of voters face the real pocket that they would not be allowed to vote. but now this unjust law will not be in effect on election day in this critical swing state
, a discussion about google operations and antitrust laws. >> almost 20 years ago, we broadcast one of the most controversial stories in our 44 years on the air. it was called yes, but is it art? i was accused of being a philistia, someone lacking the esthetic ability to appreciate contemporary art. in those 20 years, works that i question worth hundreds of thousands of dollars are now worth hundreds of millions. >> what made everybody so that 20 years ago? >> i discovered something that i had absolutely could barely believe -- that when you question someone's taste in art, thanmore personal politics, religion, sexual preference. it is something that goes to the very soul when you say you b ought that? > sunday at 8:00 on c-span's q&a. now, an american enterprise institute panel discussion examining whether google is violating antitrust laws. topics included the market for internet search, and an analysis of google's business model. pedal trade commission chairman john leibovitz has said that the ftc plans to make a decision on whether to take legal action against google by the end of this year
against that state's new voter i.d. law for now. a judge in the past few hours blocked the law from goalkeeper into effect. judge simpson ordered the sat not to enforce the voter i.d. requirement in this year's election, but it will go into full effect next year. opponents of the law say it would hurt voter turnover, especially among minorities and the leeld he who are likely to vote for democrats in that state. it was in june that a top state republican lawmaker predicted the law would help governor romney. >> which is going to allow governor romney to win the state of pennsylvania, done. >> and joining us now, judith brown, diana's co-director of the advancement project, a civil rights organization that filed the lawsuit. thank you for your time. we played that state lawmaker who said if that law was in effect in pennsylvania, he felt that governor romney would win that state, done. the polling shows opposite. nevertheless there was a concern. let's talk about the split decision. the judge is blocking it for now, but what happens next? >> well, you know, this is a big victory for
of noncompliance of the state law and should be a policy of the commission for that provision. that's one thing. and the other thing i wanted to point out is that the agenda for tonight did not include the minutes. just said that you were going to vote for the minutes. it would be nice if you could put that to the next meeting for those of us who have not seen those have a period to comment. thank you. >> good afternoon, commissioner hur and ethic commissioners. i am troubled that you scheduled my two cases on today's agenda. it's unethical for the ethics commission to even decide a case involving your own executive director. and the whole case should have been transferred to another jurisdiction. not just for developing a recommendation. but for holding any sort of public hearing on the matter. mr. chatfield, when he transferred my case to san jose. noted in the cover mail, quote, the ethic's commission regularly handles cases for the sunshine force act. and however cannot be (inaudible) as executive director is the named respondent in both claims, end quote. it should be argued that the ethic
in the health care law changes that one bit. >> brown: now the case that they did argue today. it's about using u.s. courts to bring international human rights law into effect against multinational corporations. >> right. brown: trying to spit it out. mulley national corporations is what i'm trying to say. >> it involves a 1789 law, the alien tort statute. very simple, straight-forward law that says federal courts have jurisdiction over actions brought by aliens who have been basically injuredded by violations of international law or violations of treaties of the united states. this is oal business. the court heard arguments last term on whether corporations could be held liable under that statute. then it later ordered reargument on a broader question. that is whether these cases can be brought in u.s. courts against any defendant who committed a violation in a foreign country. and today the court heard arguments on that. it's hard to tell. it seemed a number of justices were not happy with business' approach which is to say there is no extra territorial application of this law, period. and ye
here was the issue. the pennsylvania passes this new voter i.d. law in march. people that didn't have a driver's license, a government-issued photo i.d. could get the michigan state identification card. then the state said that can be used to board airplanes. we need all sorts of forms of identification. then the state changed its mind and said we'll issue a voter i.d. card that's different. only if you can't get the other card. then they changed their mind on that. the judge said i can't be sure. even though the state has now cured a lot of these problems, i can't be sure enough people are going to be able to get the right kind of identification to allow this law to go into effect. i'm going to let the state continue to educate people about the need for photo i.d. i'm going to let the state ask for photo i.d. atle positive, but enjoin the part of the law that requires voters to have photo i.d. people wanted it all put on hold. the judge said i don't need to go that far. there is always the possibility the state could go back to the supreme court on this, but begin how skeptica
- in-law had surgery that it would be a good idea if an older person lived on pain pills instead of having their problem taken care of. another thing, and egos around the country and talks, he looks almost like the rabble-rousers' when he goes around the country, it looks almost like a rabble rouser. host: gene is an independent. good morning at. -- jean. caller: i will not vote for paul ryan. i have been watching -- i watch c-span a lot and the commentaries on the other political channels. he does not ring true to me. i had been watching before he was on the ticket and have been following it for years with john boehner and his congress. i will not vote for anybody of john boehner's crowd. host: ok. a little bit more insight into the polling. a rasmussen poll fromepo the weekend -- is more from the vice-president on the weekends and florida. [video clip] >> they're spending a lot of time telling you what barack obama and joe biden are against and what we have done. the attack everything. the truth of the matter is that nowhere is it more clear what they would do that in medicare.
's mayor is speaking out tonight after an emotional weekend. someone torched his law office on saturday. the fbi is expected to investigate the fire as a possible act of domestic terrorism. jodi hernandez joins us in vallejo this evening with details. >> reporter: good evening. the mayor has faced a lot of challenges since taking office but nothing rises to this level. you can see the damage caused when an arsonist set fire to the mayor's private law office over the weekend. today mayor davis spoke for the first time about the torching calling it malicious and cowardly. >> although i believe that the last criminal act is part of an escalating attempt to intimidate me, let me make it very, very clear. it has failed. >> reporter: a defiant vallejo mayor says he went let saturday morning's arson fire that destroyed his private law office steer him off course but davis believes the torching was political. >> i will say that the number of acts of vandalism which i have been subjected to over the recent past causes me to believe that this incident is related to my position as mayor. >> report
photo i.d. law would give the election to mitt romney are a at least give them pennsylvania. as one republican said, democrats would be too lazy to get a new i.d. card. he's a neat guy. today a state judge delayed implementation of the law until after the election. what a big victory for honesty and i think justice. i guess republicans are going to have to try to win pennsylvania the hard way, by getting the most votes. >>> also, a lot of dnts think or hope that scott brown came on too strong in his debate last night with elizabeth warren. we'll go to the videotape and look very closely. >>> look who has another etch-a-sketch moment. mitt romney now says he won't revoke obama's two-year visas for qualified young illegal immigrants. well, maybe he's seen the polling on latinos lately which are devastating. >>> let me finish with a behind the scenes look at what really happened at the great kennedy/nixon debates. you will love these stories i have dug up. this is "hardball," the place for politics. and cheese add up to 100 calories? your world. ♪ [ whispers ] real bacon... creamy ch
todd and great howard fineman. >>> republicans in pennsylvania thought their voter i.d. law would give them the election up there in pennsylvania. one republicans said democrats would be too lazy to get an i.d. today a state judge stopped the implementation until after the election. >>> a lot of democrats think or hope that scott brown up in massachusetts came on too strong in his debate last night with elizabeth warren. >>> let who's had another etch-a-sketch moment. mitt romney says he won't revoke the self-deportation for illegal immigrants. >>> let me fin wish a behind the scene looks in what happened in the great kennedy/nixon debates. i've got it for you. this is "hardball," the place for politics. and every day since, we've worked hard to keep it. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help people and businesses who were affected, and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open for everyone to enjoy -- and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. we've shared what we've learned with governments and across the industry so we can all
in his life after he leaves no walking goes to stanford law school is becoming a clerk to supreme court justice robert jackson. tell us a little bit about how that came about because i want it to lead into what you are unfolding here into this conservatism on blacks and whites. >> guest: right. jackson was i think seen by the end even as a great justice and he had been the prosecutor at the nuremberg war trial and it actually taken time off from the court and went to nuremberg as a chief prosecutor in and came back to the court so rehnquist graduates from the stanford law school early at the end of 1952. he was actually in class that would have graduated a semester later but rehnquist finishes working and was so smart he got out early. and so he wanted to -- it was clear when i was researching through his papers and looking at the diaries that he had actually, that were on deposit with his papers were fascinating. he had six notebooks that were filled with his reminiscences and his desires and early comments and memoirs and one of the things that was clear was that he really saw himself
because it is in your state that these laws are made, not in the white house and in congress. >> joy reid gets tonight's last word. thanks for joining me. >>> does romney like you? let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. on the way to denver. let me start with this brand new nbc/wall street journal poll out tonight. what it shows in addition to an obama leading that's hardening is a deep concern that mitt romney said about that 47% of the country he says can't be counted on to meet its responsibility. it's that part of the country that romney has dismissed as free-loaders, moochers, takers. people, especially veteran families, people retired on social security, regular americans, that is, don't like being dismissed that way, injury added by insult. i'm joined by chuck todd and howard fineman with "the huffington post." the latest poll shows among likely voters the president leads 49% to 46% for romney. that's down net two points from two weeks ago when the president was up by five. to what to you attribute the movement, chuck todd? >> we
that was done by south chinese emperor who had never heard of law of the seas because that concept didn't exist many years ago. so the issue of the islands, and there are hundreds of islands, requires in my view first of all separating the notion of freedom of the seas from the issue of sovereignty over the islands. but my colleagues here will be held to give much fuller explanation of the issue. what i want to say is that both sides have to make up their mind that they are trying to do something that is historically unprecedented. and in a way competing countries recognize that the international system requires a victory of cooperation between, if they are not going to drift into a confrontation which will then split every other country to participate in. each side will be able to list the mistakes that the other side has made, and of course, but the one favorable thing you can say about this challenge is the most nonpartisan foreign policy in america today is the american administration since 1971 have pursued a centrally, the same course. now, two locations, two president tried to reinvent t
limited. a duty for liberty and right to keep me free and uphold the rule of law to ensure the system if we suffer injury in the physical sense or through fraud. the government can't keep us safe and it's so limited they should not be telling me that i have to buy health insurance or i will get taxed more. what should the role of government be in your life we are asking you in this morning's journal. it states in the constitution of the federal government is to do. 18 enumerations, the rest are reserved for the state's and the people. next call, jeff in texas. good morning to you, sir. >> caller: that would be kevin in washington. >> host: good morning. you are on the air. go ahead. >> caller: i believe that if the proper role of the federal government is to protect individual liberties we are supposed to have rules against that, against fraud, against the injured. but the problem is the federal government has gone way beyond that. it seems like they want to redistribute what people have gained through their liberties and freedoms and once you do that, you are violating people's liber
was the rule for america's schools. a law that allowed schools to separate students by race. that's until warren said that separate is inherently unequal. we take a look back 60 years after that decision. >> reporter: this could be any schoolyard in any city in america. 50 years ago the scene was much different. white children went to one school while black children went the to another. segregation had been the law of the land since 1896 cemented the separate but equal doctrine. after world worldd war ii ended, cracks began appearing. president harry trueman desegregated the armed services. jackie robinson became the first african american. and thurgood marshall was gaining steam. 7-year-old linda brown became the icon for the landmark supreme court ruling. she had to travel dozens of blocks to a black elementary school but her home was just seven blocks away from sumner elementary, an all white school. >> i had spanish american play mates, i had native american play mates, i had white play mates and we played together on a daily basis. but when school started, they went one way and i wen
. >> reporter: today he showed a face of resolve. he did say that his law office has been the target of vandalism in the past, specifically rocks thrown through the windows. the mayor clearly believes its some kind of message of intimidation. >> let me make it very, very clear. it has failed. i am nowt not now, nor will i ever be, intimidated by such cowardly acts of conduct. >> reporter: vallejo police are still saying they do not know who caused this. >> i think there could be. until we know for sure, we have to look at it in those terms. >> reporter: there's some criticism from some aspects of the community here for supporting the police in some officer-involved shootings recently. but police are not saying whether that might be the motivation for this fire. they're not citing any evidence whatsoever of the so-called domestic terrorism. now that there's been a second arson just down the street, the question comes up, could this just be a firebug that has absolutely no statement whatsoever to make? reporting live in vallejo, joe vazquez, cbs 5. >>> the other big story we're follow
office of this law firm was gutted. from the start it looked like arson, a fire at 1:30 in the morning and a locked up building. >> every smoke building throughout, it's a suspicious fire. >> reporter: suspicious enough, teams from the fbi and atf will join the investigation. the office is shared by vallejo major ozzy davis who came to the scene along with his law partner michael thompson who he led away from the building. visibly upset. >> reporter: we're classifying this as a class of domestic terrorism. >> reporter: the office sits across the street from the courthouse so surveillance cameras may provide clues. the neighborhood gets its share of random vandalism, but the fire is much worse than anything davis' law office has faced before. >> acts of vandalism, such as broken glass, rocks through windows and things of that nature. >> reporter: davis has presided over rocky times, and was caught up in recent outcry over several officer involved shootings. whether politics played a role in the fire is a question investigators will hit hard. >> reporter: has the mayor had any threats ag
-- berkeley where he attended law school. he was, i'm sad to report, not much of a student, but he was a joiner of fraternities and maker of friends. and it was there at berkeley that he came of age just as california bulldozed its way into a new kind of politics in state history. the political movement that warren was witness to was, importantly from the his perspective, led by a trial lawyer. even as a somewhat shy young boy, warren had dreamed of practicing law in a courtroom, and as a college student he had the opportunity to watch up close one of the most arresting trial lawyers of his generation. hiram johnson, of whom i'm speaking, was a young lawyer in san francisco who was could upon to take over a corruption case against the city's mayor and some co-conspirators in a bribery scandal. he took over the case, he was second chair of the case at the outset but took over the first chair when the lead prosecutor was shot in the head in court by a dismissed juror. law students, take note. [laughter] it -- johnson made his name in that case and went on to serve as governor of cali
that question paper or plastic anymore. beginning tomorrow at every grocery store in san francisco a new law goes on the book at midnight. it outlaws most retailers from packing merchandise into plastic bags. customers will pay ten cents for every paper or compostable bag they use. >> san francisco just keeps getting a little more expensive it sounds like. >> people want a paper bag, it's ten cents. hopefully it's not too big of a deal for them. >> city leaders hope the new law will force consumers to be more ecofriendly and carry reusable tote bags with them on shopping trips. san francisco's existing plastic bag ban applies only to chain grocery and drug stores. the new law will cover most mom and pop stores, too, as well as the national chains. >>> governor brown today is giving juveniles a second chance by saying no to a controversial therapy and denying children multiple parents. the governor signed a bill that will give some juvenile sentenced to life without parole a chance to earn it, but not before serving at least 15 years. he also approved a bill ending a type of psychotherapy mak
that the republicans haven't been able to find very much voter fraud to justify all the laws so they decided to create some themselves. that's one of the sort of terrible down sides of this. if they use this as an excuse to e say, we need these tough voter i.d. laws because you made the essential point. there were two broad points of view on this. one is we're so worried about fraud we're going to make it really hard for a lot of people to vote or that the whole process is supposed to make it easy for people to cast ballots. and that the worst thing they did was to destroy people's voter registration forms. but i don't remember anything like this except acorn. and i think this is where we're going to have to ask our conservative friends. they went nuts over acorn, the progressive group having bad registrations. acorn itself, by the way, had called the attention of voter registrars to the fraud themselves. they disciplined themselves. and yet this was a big scandal and acorn lost a lot of money and had to go out of business. why isn't this the same thing for conservatives given what they did? >> the th
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 169 (some duplicates have been removed)